Whitebird

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icehouse
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Re: Fuel Supply

Post by icehouse » 07 Oct 2008 23:25

okayfine wrote: Ted Hedman said it was quiet (which was a priority), and that it fed his (at the time) SUs without a regulator. Not having to add in a regulator was a nice bonus.

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I like to install the fuel pump on the X-memeber, since its on rubber bushings it also helps isolate the noise. Just remember to ground the pump to the body not the X-member :D I guess in your case its a little to late :(
"People don't like it when shit doesn't match their rule of thumb." Sam

goichi1
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Re: Whitebird

Post by goichi1 » 08 Oct 2008 06:23

I used the original oil sending unit off of my L16, remember, being JDM I had the oil pressure gauge option already, it fit right in the SR Block, yes, you will have some clearance issues, I just found the smallest oil filter that would still seal and still had to slightly dent the side facing the sending unit, I will add an extention to my oil sender to fix this on my next oil change, i don't see it being a problem right now anyway.

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okayfine
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Re: Fuel Supply

Post by okayfine » 08 Oct 2008 08:03

icehouse wrote:I like to install the fuel pump on the X-memeber, since its on rubber bushings it also helps isolate the noise. Just remember to ground the pump to the body not the X-member :D I guess in your case its a little to late :(
Well...that makes too much sense. Where were you last week?? :twisted:

But, now I know to think about that if I need to. This particular pump is supposed to be quiet, but we shall see.

I also wondered if I could just run the SR ignition from the EFI ECU, but didn't investigate too far and figured it was a no-go. I have a meeting of the minds planned for an EI L20B distributor and the SR CAS. SR shaft and base, mix in the L20B guts (bingo, bango?) and it's done. That's the plan, but those pieces are in a box under my work bench. I need to get the carbs squared away before getting to that point. Again, trying to keep it looking stock, so I'll run a coil in the stock location and everything.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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okayfine
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Cooling Fan and Shroud

Post by okayfine » 10 Oct 2008 08:15

Keeping with the "originality" goal, I wanted to run the stock radiator. Well, stock tanks, anyway, as this radiator has a three-row core. It should be enough to keep a non-turbo SR cool, especially as the all-aluminum construction of the SR will radiate more heat than the iron KA. I installed a Griffin all-aluminum radiator in my KA510 and during some months of the year, even in SoCal, it overcooled the engine and left me with 150° coolant on the freeway and next to no heating action. I don't want to undercool the SR, especially as it is all aluminum and a bad overheat may well warp the entire engine, so I came up with the following cooling accessories.

The stock 510 fan shroud isn't made to mount a fan, and the opening was much larger than necessary. It must be oblong because at its widest it was over 14", yet the core of the radiator isn't more than 11" tall. In searching for electric fans, I came across the Perma-Cool HP line. These fans drew more CFM than their lesser brothers (Perma-Cool has a few different lines of fans) with only a small additional cost. I purchased the 10" fan, P/N 19010 which is 13" x 10.5" x 2.5", and pulls 1250 CFM at 6.8 amps. I looked at the 12" fan, but at 3.75" depth, I didn't have room to mount it between the radiator and the engine. It would have pulled an even more useful 1650 CFM. I could have fit this fan if I used a thinner VW-esque radiator.

In any case, as the fan arrived via Summit Racing last night, I set about making a fan shround and mount in one. The fan came with the through-radiator cable ties, but the fan's effectiveness would be largely diminished without a shroud. Some 20ga sheet metal later:

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The shroud looks a little restrictive and it remains to be seen if it is. If it is I plan to cut large holes along the sides and bolt on rubber flaps, as is common on VW stuff. This allows enhanced flow through the shroud when the car is moving (moving air will push the flaps open) yet will still provide a mostly-sealed area for the fan to draw through when the car is stopped in traffic and the fan's on.

The assembly mounts nicely to the stock radiator:

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I purchased a Painless fan wiring kit, mostly because it came with a GM metric temp sender. This sender screws right in to the sensor bung in the SR, so I don't have to splice in an adapter to the main coolant hoses.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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icehouse
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Re: Whitebird

Post by icehouse » 10 Oct 2008 15:32

The fan shroud does look somewhat restrictive, its hard to say if it will work or not. For the longest time on my 620 all I had was a S13 AC fan :D It worked fine until August, and that is on a single core 720 radiator. It would be nice to space the shroud out an inch our 2 from the radiator, allowing an even pull, but we all know SR is kind of a hog when it comes to space :D
"People don't like it when shit doesn't match their rule of thumb." Sam

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okayfine
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Fan Shroud becomes Fan Mounting

Post by okayfine » 13 Oct 2008 08:17

icehouse wrote:The fan shroud does look somewhat restrictive, its hard to say if it will work or not. For the longest time on my 620 all I had was a S13 AC fan :D It worked fine until August, and that is on a single core 720 radiator. It would be nice to space the shroud out an inch our 2 from the radiator, allowing an even pull, but we all know SR is kind of a hog when it comes to space :D
Yes, I had a rethink over the weekend spawned by another friendly suggestion that I rethink it over the weekend. After busting the original mild steel sheet with my jig saw (which I also snapped the blade on), I traced a design onto some stainless sheet that I had. Instead of trying the same corner cuts with the jig saw and fail, I decided to cut all the inside corners with a hole saw. Well, got through 5 of 8 holes before I toasted my hole saw. It'll still cut wood but will just rub the stainless to a nice dull brown finish. I had to finish it with an angle grinder.

However, flow shouldn't be a problem:

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All part of the process, I suppose.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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bertvorgon
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Re: Whitebird

Post by bertvorgon » 13 Oct 2008 09:00

Your on the right track, but, I do recommend that a "dam" on the FRONT of the rad is what really helps the flow through the rad. I was good that you open up that shroud, as you would not have had enough flow through the rad. At spead the fan is really not an issue, whereas the air stalling in front of the rad, as what lessens the cooling. Making sure the rad is sealed to the radiator support, so that the air has to go THROUGH the rad, not around or down the bottom, is what really helps the whole cooling issue. The plates fro your mounting frame shoud stand off from the rad a bit, but, the shroud around the rad should be tight to it. A small 1/4 to 1/2 " gap can make as much as 200 CFM difference in air flow. ( based on chart that came with the fans the Byron and I used.)

Check out the thread I did in the spring on my radiators "dam" that I finally did for mine. TECHNICAL/FAN SHROUD PROJECT.

Having watched what Specialty Engineering has done on all the cars he builds, he spends as much time on the front side of the rad, as he does on what is happening to the back side, in regards to air flow.

One of the reasons of the long term success of my motor, and any performance motor for that fact, is of keeping things cool. Keeping the thermal load under control cannot be understated, and as the compression and power goes up, that becomes even more of a task. While getting a good sized radiator in there is paramount, getting the air to flow through the rad, as efficiently as possible, is a big bonus too.

The air can and will stall to a certain extent, and take the path of least resistance sometimes, going through every other opening it can find. With that in mind, a common practice is to seal, and/or build walls and dams, to make the air go just through the rad. This is a very simple project I have wanted to do for some time. So, with a sheet of construction paper in hand, I made the templates, four pieces in all. Then, with everything laid out, and looking ok, I transfered the paper paterns to 3/32" aluminum sheet. I rough cut those on a shear, then, bent them as needed. I then laid out the holes on the aluminum, then transfered that to the rad support, and drilled that. Bolting everything together loosely, let me check that all dimensions stayed true to the originals. I put a small bend in the bottom piece, as a bit of an "aero dynamic lip", and, I though it just looked a bit better than a straight piece.

I used stainless screws and Nylocs for the hardware. I even siliconed the openings right beside the rad tanks and the start of the fins, so no wasted air escapes going through the cooling fins and cores.

Total cost of project was about 25.00, which was the paint, the stainless, and a small piece of aluminum from the salvage guys.
"Racing makes heroin addiction look like a vague wish for something salty" - Peter Egan

Keith Law
1973 2Door Slalom/hill climb/road race / canyon carver /Giant Killer 510
1968 Vintage 3HP Mini Bike
1971 Vintage 13' BOLER trailer

goichi1
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Re: Whitebird

Post by goichi1 » 14 Oct 2008 06:48

Hey!! Congrats, I just read that you will be the next one on DQ!! looks like it's gonna be a good issue!! I can't wait to read it.....but i must say, your garage looks clean! how do you keep is so clean while you work on your car?? Mine was always a disaster area!!! later, Rich

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okayfine
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Re: Whitebird

Post by okayfine » 14 Oct 2008 08:29

goichi1 wrote:Hey!! Congrats, I just read that you will be the next one on DQ!! looks like it's gonna be a good issue!! I can't wait to read it.....but i must say, your garage looks clean! how do you keep is so clean while you work on your car?? Mine was always a disaster area!!! later, Rich
Thanks, Rich, but it's not too hard to get in DQ when you're the one putting each issue together. It's not what you know, it's who you know. :lol:

As to the garage, it's not all that spacious, so everything needs to go back to its place when I'm done with it. A consequence of that is that things are always easy to find since they're where they should be. Of course, you're only seeing my garage's best side in that picture.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

goichi1
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Re: Whitebird

Post by goichi1 » 14 Oct 2008 09:06

Haahaha...yea, I know what you mean! I wish I would have taken more pictures of the mess that I made while building mine! I would have to clean it two or three times a week to keep it up......that's why I did the major scrub after the car was out!! In Japan I have put a few big carpets down, but i don't really plan on doing much major stuff there!...

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miguel sss
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Re: Whitebird

Post by miguel sss » 27 Oct 2008 06:05

More pics!!!! I like this topic...

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okayfine
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Battery Relocation

Post by okayfine » 29 Oct 2008 14:36

When I had the engine out during my SR swap, I didn't relocate the battery because I didn't know I was going to need to due to space issues. I wanted to keep the battery in the stock location for the originality aspect and specifically because I don't do body work and I know I'd hack up the job.

During one of the trial fits of the SR SU manifold, it was obvious that the carb body and the eventual filter housing were going to occupy the same space as the battery.

So the battery had to go in the trunk. $35 of 1-gauge cable was routed from the passenger side of the trunk under the rear seat, under the carpet and passenger seat to an insulated brass pass-through in the firewall. From the engine side of the pass-through the + cable connects to the starter as stock.

With the engine in place, I wasn't going to attempt to remove the battery tray at this point. So I decided to use it to mount my various relays.

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Two headlight relays (for the H4 headlights) and the cooling fan relay are currently mounted.

(Pay no attention to the jumpered voltage regulator plug. This will get rewired, and the wiring taped up, once I'm sure everything is charging as it should.)
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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okayfine
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New Shoes

Post by okayfine » 29 Oct 2008 14:44

So, sourcing new front brake shoes ended up being an easy process that I made difficult. I tried to find the part number that is listed in the Parts Catalog for front drum brake shoes. NLA from Nissan USA of course, as the car never came here, but I had fits getting a sure answer from Nissan Canada (which can get stuff from Japan, hence I had more hope). In the end that didn't pan out, so I had to find an alternative.

410s had front drum brakes, but most online parts places don't have a listing for available brake shoes. Autozone did, however what they sent was a box of rear brake shoes, so that didn't help. The 1500 Roadster also had front drum brakes and after agonizing and comparing photos from Datsunparts.com to what I have on the car, I eventually ordered a set. It was a gamble of $75, but what was I gunna do, run around on 1mm of front brake shoe material for the next 50,000 kilometers?

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New shoes. A real PITA to R&R them (those orange springs are very stiff), but I managed with only minor sweating and somewhat-minor swearing. The adjusters are much easier to work with than the test/retest adjusters on the rear.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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okayfine
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Cooling Fan Electronics

Post by okayfine » 29 Oct 2008 14:49

As mentioned, I am using the Painless Wiring 30106 kit, which is for GM LS V8s. I picked this kit because it includes a metric-threaded temperature switch. Painless says it's a 10mm x 1.5 thread, it looks like a 12mm thread to me, but whatever since it threads right in to the upper coolant neck of the SR.

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The Painless switch is the larger piece in the center. The right sensor is for the instrument panel and connects up to the stock water temperature wiring.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

iceD
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Re: Whitebird

Post by iceD » 29 Oct 2008 14:51

Have you tried to find a brake shop that can resurface the shoe you have?
Just a thought I believe there is a shop in Vancouver that does that for the local racers.

ice D

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