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Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 22 Sep 2014 11:54
by RONSLYCHUK
I agree with Julian,the darker colour looks better. Ron.

Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 22 Sep 2014 16:29
by Byron510
It's interesting that I too prefer the darker wheels as well. I used to think it was because everyone they look good on lighter coloured cars. But now I'm beginning to realize that we just got "shiney wheel'd out" in the last couple decades, with the chrome Craigers in the 70's and 80's leading I to the "everything billet" revolution of the 90's and 00's. I even chose black wheels for my not so bright Bronze car and really like it. However looking around at various builds finished in derivatives of white and I think the dark wheels really make those cars. It's a general statement, because there shave been a few exceptions.

My thoughts anyways, go charcoal minimum :-).

Byron

Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 22 Sep 2014 16:58
by JordanTr
I like the dark, but darker would be better. I am not a bronze wheel guy myself though. I do like the 5 spokes though!

[I'm also slightly biased towards dark wheels! :D]

Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 23 Oct 2014 05:03
by S15DET
The cool dry weather prompted me to make another late-night run to the local drag strip. A few months ago my best time was 13.4 @ 106. First pass last night was 13.2, second pass was the night's best at 13.032 @ 107. On the 205 Dunlops traction and driver skill is still the limiting factor, but it sure was fun. My father-in-law and I drove the car home after 5 passes, so I guess that means we won.

Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 16 Dec 2014 13:24
by S15DET
I tried my hand at aluminum brazing this weekend. There were two small cracks in the radiator end tank from rubbing against a metal ear on the t-bolt clamp on the upper intercooler pipe. They were tiny so an ideal case for brazing. I first peened the area down to create clearance between the corner of the tank and the clamp to avoid this situation, then cleaned the area very well with alcohol and a S.S. brush. I used these alumiweld rods...
http://www.alumiweld.com/
I picked up a fresh bottle of MAPP gas from the hardware store which was plenty of heat for this this metal, but it still took about 3 minutes of constant heat to get the area up to the melting temp of the filler. The puddle flowed right into the cracks. After a few minutes to cool I smoothed it a bit with a flapper disc. So far it's totally dry so I feel good that it'll be a reliable repair, but the heat of summer will be the real test.

Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 16 Dec 2014 22:11
by Byron510
If you have an oxy/acetylene outfit, then you can also pressure test your repaired tank by building plugs for the outlets and plumbing in one inlet. Fill the tank with water, then rig one oxy lie after the reg into the rab, build pressure and watch. Your system likely isn't much above 15 psi. I know I took the Bronze system to 30 PSI when I built the rad and surge tank (which is also pressurized in my system). Since the rad is out, and clean. It's a great time to test your work.

Just a thought, because you likely have the tools at home.

If no oxy/acetylene outfit, you can use a bicycle pump and a shraider valve just as easily, submerge the tank in a rubber maid or equivalent tub and whalla. You should easily build 25 psi with a bike pump....

Byron

Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 17 Dec 2014 10:12
by okayfine
If using the bike pump and you know where you need to check for leaks, just spray a soap/water solution on the area once you've pressurized it. It'll bubble if there's a leak.

Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 17 Dec 2014 10:31
by S15DET
Thanks, I guess it would have been a good idea to pressure-check it before installation huh? I wanted to drive it the next day so I put it back into service. I can borrow a coolant system pressure tester that just connects to the pressure cap and has a hand pump to pressurize the whole system, hoses, heater core and all. It has a large finely graduated gauge which you can monitor over time to see if there are any leaks. Set at exactly 15, go to dinner or to bed, come back and see if it's still exactly 15.

Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 23 Sep 2015 13:49
by S15DET
Long time since the last update. I finally installed the new windshield following my bonehead gravity check with the air gun. After not driving it for a time while sourcing the glass, it's a real joy. Cranked right up, all systems go, and the cooler weather is really noticeable.
I did another track weekend back in June. Car was perfect, temps stable. Tires, not so much, I corded one of the Hoosiers so I drove the 2nd day on my commuter Dunlops. You know what, it was just as much fun! I turned a 2:00 even at CMP on those crappy tires.

Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 16 Mar 2016 07:09
by S15DET
It's been too long, time for a major/minor update from a few winter projects.
I finally addressed the bubbles that were showing on both rear quarters. I met an older gentleman, local to me, who recently retired from a career in bodywork and had set up a very nice backyard shop. We considered Dave's replacement quarter panels, but he convinced me that my issue was too minor to warrant replacing the whole panel. He cut out the old rear corner and fabricated new panels from scratch, a dying art it would seem. His work turned out to be nicer than I thought possible. The shape and fit, even the bumper indention, is perfect and the color match is invisible. A really beautiful job and I couldn't be happier.
The other major update is that I finally had the E30 BMW seats recovered. My goal was to pay tribute to the Datsun Competition seat, so I ordered the basket-weave material to match the rear seat, with horizontal pleating in the center and the metal vent grommets. They turned out great and the look is just what I had hoped for, a period appropriate look with modern adjustability and support. They are so much more comfortable than the Toyota seats that have carried me for the last 68,000 miles.
When I installed the 6-speed a few years ago, I was in a rush to make the Mitty event at Road Atlanta so I cobbled together a "temporary" transmission mount in the middle of the night. I finally made a proper replacement with curved and welded steel. It's a simple design, but the curves and weldment (not seen in the photo) make it very stiff while lightweight.
The car has been as reliable as ever, I haven't had to make any repairs. 68k miles and smiles all the way!!

Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 16 Mar 2016 07:35
by WxMan
Wow, your interior is so neat and tidy. It looks great. Love the instrument set up... and the seats too. They look incredible. Nice work.

Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 16 Mar 2016 07:50
by 510wizard
Really loving those seats. Car looks great!

Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 16 Mar 2016 13:43
by duke
68,000 miles! Awesome. This is a perfect example of how a car should be built and used.

Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 18 Mar 2016 08:20
by S15DET
Thanks for all the kind words guys. I typed 68k but I meant 67k miles, but still. The car is incredible fun.

Re: Brad's '69 project

Posted: 18 Mar 2016 15:02
by 510rob
I love it. Everything looks really good and as Duke said (and I agree with 100%), everything looks to be as it should be.