On My Dime

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Byron510
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Re: On My Dime

Postby Byron510 » 19 May 2016 23:26

Interestingly I found very little difference with the spherical bush conversion on my car, even running R compound Yoko's on track days. My bushes were worn, but if I had the choice again I would stay with the OEM type rubber bushes. Not because they work well with my brackets, but because I didn't see a difference in the handling out back. I did see an increase in NVH though, that's not hard to miss!

One common mistake I have seen many people do is tighten the rear control arm pivots down with the wheels in the drooped position. This is absolutely incorrect, as you twist the bushing and preload it. This will lead to extremely premature wear of the rubber bushing. You should assemble the whole works with the pivot bolts loose, but in place. If the car is on jack stands it a 2 post, Get each control arm at ride height before tightening down the LCA pivot bolts buy jacking the arm upwards.

Just something to keep in mind.

Byron
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bertvorgon
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Re: On My Dime

Postby bertvorgon » 20 May 2016 05:16

Just my two cents, I too still have the rubber bushings in the rear of my car and they did me well for over 30 years of competition on race tires. If there was any deflection there, I could not feel it.
"Racing makes heroin addiction look like a vague wish for something salty" - Peter Egan

1973 2Door Slalom/hill climb/road race / canyon carver /Giant Killer 510
1968 Vintage 3HP Mini Bike
1971 Vintage 13' BOLER trailer

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WxMan
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Re: On My Dime

Postby WxMan » 20 May 2016 11:17

Thanks guys. That's great information. I've ordered some OEM rubber bushes and I will certainly take your advice on reassembly Byron.
Russell

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Doraemon
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Re: On My Dime

Postby Doraemon » 21 May 2016 14:43

Where can you order OEM rubber bushes ? Local Nissan dealer ?

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okayfine
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Re: On My Dime

Postby okayfine » 21 May 2016 15:09

Depends on your dealer network. They were available from the US dealers, if the parts guys cared to look. You could find the e-mail for Chico Nissan and direct in inquiry to Chad. If the parts are available, he'd find them, and he'd ship to NL.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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WxMan
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Re: On My Dime

Postby WxMan » 21 May 2016 15:54

I ordered mine from www.new-datsun-parts.com. Not necessarily the cheapest option but they're in Canada which keeps the shipping and duty costs down for me and I needed a few other things that they had that aren't easy to source.
Russell

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WxMan
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Re: On My Dime

Postby WxMan » 09 Jun 2016 13:25

I've been plugging away at this pretty constantly lately but haven't made much progress. My left rear bottom shock mount bolt sheared off with the greatest of ease when I was taking the rear end apart. In my efforts to remove the broken bolt I drilled out as much of the bolt as I could but then snapped off the removal tool that I was using. Probably the best option at this point would have been to weld a nut on the thing and go from there but I don't have access to a welder. Instead I spent a great deal of time with a burr on a rotary tool trying to remove the broken tool which was a much much harder material than the bolt. In the end I was successful however the time wasted on this was very frustrating.

Next on my list was to remove the rear axle parts in the hub. I could see that a previous owner had attempted to remove the axle nut on one side. The other was untouched.

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Untouched Axle Nut

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Axle nut worked over by a previous owner

I used a small cutting wheel on my rotary tool to remove the pinched part at the top of the nut that locks it in place. The axle nut that was worked over previously actually came off without much trouble. The one that was untouched before I started on it is really putting up a fight. I can't get enough leverage on it with my breaker bar to remove it. I happen to own an impact wrench but I don't currently own a compressor. I've been putting that rather large outlay off for a while but it seems it might be time to pony up.

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New Axle Nut and the old one.

Now that at least one axle nut is off, should the axle just slip out? It isn't and I'm reluctant to start whacking it with a hammer unless I know that is how it should be done. My Haynes manual only discusses solid axle removal and if it is in there I can't find any mention of this in the "Keeping your Datsun Alive" book. Anyone know how to get this thing out? BFH, press?

Image
Russell

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RMS
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Re: On My Dime

Postby RMS » 09 Jun 2016 14:11

a two jaw puller works well, a 3 jaw is hard to get a bite and a metal hammer can easily bell the end. have been successful with a brass drift and hammer but if its tight its likely to bell.
two_68_510s wrote:I guess our donkeys are quicker then your sled dogs!

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bertvorgon
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Re: On My Dime

Postby bertvorgon » 09 Jun 2016 15:37

What we have found works great...if you have a good air compressor...is put a pointed air chisel in it and it will hammer it out very nicely. As you can see there is a nice recess there in the end of the shaft.

No...they do not come out easily
"Racing makes heroin addiction look like a vague wish for something salty" - Peter Egan

1973 2Door Slalom/hill climb/road race / canyon carver /Giant Killer 510
1968 Vintage 3HP Mini Bike
1971 Vintage 13' BOLER trailer

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WxMan
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Re: On My Dime

Postby WxMan » 09 Jun 2016 17:16

Thanks for the suggestions. I don't have a jaw puller or a good compressor yet however I did get myself a small shop press recently. I wrestled the thing in there and it came out without too much pressure.

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Next I fought with the grease seal and it eventually came out. The bearing still inside the control arm then came out pretty easily with the press. The press works really well but it can be a bit tricky getting awkward things placed in it properly.

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The last thing I need to get off now is that bearing still on the shaft. I guess I'm going to have to go shopping for a large jaw puller unless anyone has any better ideas.
Russell

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Byron510
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Re: On My Dime

Postby Byron510 » 09 Jun 2016 18:23

The axles certainly should not fall out, they need to have at minimum a size for size fit on the inner race - and that folks is a light press fit.

It seems you once had access to tools, and are now missing them! Do you have a pot you can get dirty on the stove? Put the shaft in boiling water for 10 minutes. It's a nice light fit. The larger the diameter, the more it will grow. It's a source of heat that most of us have access and it may be enough.
Alternately you could use your oven - depends on how clean you can get it and how good your relationship is with your wife/family! 400F in the oven certainly would do the trick, and it's no where near hot enough to effect the shaft material. Once hot, invert the shaft (with gloves on) and give it a good hard impact with a solid block of wood (like oak) that is on a concrete floor. The shock will evenly start to move the bearing. If you try to pry it off, you will most likely caulk the bearing and your chances of being successful drop dramatically.

It may work for you, worth a shot before going out and renting/buying/beg,borrow,steal a bearing puller.

Byron
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WxMan
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Re: On My Dime

Postby WxMan » 09 Jun 2016 19:37

Last time I moved my compressor was damaged irreparably by the movers unfortunately I didn't notice until it was too late to hold them accountable. It wasn't a huge loss as that compressor was pretty cheap and not really adequate for many things anyway. I want to replace it with a more capable unit but I know that won't come cheap. If anyone has recommendations for a good compressor I'm all ears. I'm just a hobbyist so my requirements aren't extreme but I'd like the unit to be capable of powering a wide range of tools.

Thanks for the tips Byron. I don't think I'll opt for the oven option. My wife and I are both pretty fond of our basically new Wolf range and even though I imagine it wouldn't do any harm I don't think I'm willing to take any chances. I do have a camping pot that I could spare. I might try the boiling technique. That said, I'm not opposed to buying tools. The only time I've ever regretted buying a tool was because it was cheap and failed and I learned long ago that the bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.
Russell

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Re: On My Dime

Postby Three B's Racing » 10 Jun 2016 04:56

WxMan wrote:The last thing I need to get off now is that bearing still on the shaft. I guess I'm going to have to go shopping for a large jaw puller unless anyone has any better ideas.


What I do is remove the four phillips screws holding the outer seals shield then I use two small nail pullers under the bearing and simply lift it out. Make sure you first clean the axle up well.
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WxMan
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Re: On My Dime

Postby WxMan » 10 Jun 2016 17:18

Well, Three B's suggestion was the least effort so I opted to try that first. I wasn't able to budge the bearing using my arms but after pressing out the wheel studs I put the axle on the floor with two small nail pullers and placed a foot on each one. Then it came off without much fuss. Thanks for the tip!

Image
Here are the axle parts minus the grease seal with the parts I plan to reuse cleaned up a bit.
Russell

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WxMan
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Re: On My Dime

Postby WxMan » 23 Jun 2016 20:26

Progress continues on what feels like the geologic time scale. A few days ago I tried to remove one of the old rear control arm bushings. At first I used my small shop press but was dismayed to find that the bushing was in there so tight that under pressure the edges of the metal encasing the bushing started to squish outward before the bushing would move. Okay, so the press wasn't going to work easily so I decided to use the same method that I used to remove the front control arm bushings. I burned out the rubber and then set to work with a hack saw on the metal sleeve left in there. That method worked reasonably well last time but damn it isn't going well this time. I ran out of time to work on it after a couple of hours and have left it for a few days as I need a little time to regain the motivation to keep struggling with it. It would be easier to face if there wasn't three more waiting for me...

I did make some progress in another area today though. Yesterday a package arrived with new universal joints for my half-shafts. It is debatable whether or not I needed or even should have replaced the originals. In the end I decided to do it because it was the only way I could fully clean and renew all of the parts of the half-shafts. Also, I'd never replaced a universal joint before and I figured why not take the opportunity to learn. I found it amusing that my shop manual suggested banging on the collar with a hammer after the C-clips were removed to get them out. It took about 5 tons of force in the press to budge them. That was after fighting with the factory C-clips that wrap around further than most aftermarket ones seem too. I just couldn't get a tool in there to pop them off and that combined with the fact that they were pretty much rusted in place made it very challenging. For most of them I had to use a small cut off wheel on my rotary too. It was a bit slow but did the job. The new U-joints went in okay for the most part but I don't think I could have done it without a press. The tolerances on those parts are so tight. The hard part was getting the new C-clips on as it always seemed I needed another 1/10 of a mm of space. They are in though and it feels good to have some more parts ready to go for that day somewhere in the future when I can start reassembling things.

Image

For the record these are GMB universal joints, made in Japan. I don't know if they are any good or not. I guess I will find out. They have a grease fitting in the cross.
Russell


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