Recommendations on a welder

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chongmang
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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by chongmang » 26 Jun 2009 17:27

defdes wrote:Correct. Unless you plan upon welding allot of stainless steel or aluminum the MIG will be fine for you.
awesome, makes sense.

OLDSCHOOLRICE
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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by OLDSCHOOLRICE » 19 Sep 2009 14:54

5 months later its finally here!!!!
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I feel like a kid in a candy store. I'm going to look into welding classes at the local community college, but for now it's going to be hands on practice, practice, practice.
I found a rusted out old 1"x1" steel tube, and tried practicing on it but it was so rusted that I needed more than just some steel wool to clean it up. I couldn't even strike arc on it.
Then I found an old saw blade laying around. Time to have some fun!
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The "R" was the first thing I did.
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Then I'm not sure what happened down here. The settings were about the same. Maybe I was just holding the gun wrong.
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Now it's off to the metal supply company to see if I can pick up an array scrap pieces to put together. The wife says she would be happy if I made her something. I'm okay with that. The electric bill is probably going to be high this month.

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defdes
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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by defdes » 19 Sep 2009 17:41

OLDSCHOOLRICE wrote: Then I'm not sure what happened down here. The settings were about the same. Maybe I was just holding the gun wrong.
Travel speed too fast arc gap probably too big, if it was the same setting as the above pics.
You want to hold the gun vertically at 90 deg. to your work piece (when welding flat position) and then tilt the gun 10 deg. in the direction of travel, usually L to R keeping the tip about 1/4" off the base metal.

OLDSCHOOLRICE
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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by OLDSCHOOLRICE » 23 Sep 2009 23:36

Thanks Defdes,

OK today at lunch I ran out to Industrial Metal Supplies and spent $30 on ~55lbs of scrap metal pieces of various thicknesses and a 24"x48" sheet of 18 guage steel. Just trying to take time to learn speed and voltage settings and techniques. I spent a couple of hours playing around, but I'm not quite sure if i'm doing it right or not. In my uneducated opinion I'm doing alright. I'm trying different kinds of things, like 90* joints, groved joints, welding vertically, etc...
Hit me with it guys- what do you think? I'm definately open to constructive criticism.
The first one was with the Auto-set on. The rest were not.
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okayfine
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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by okayfine » 24 Sep 2009 07:31

Cut apart some of your test pieces to check for weld penetration. Are you beveling the edges of your butt-weld tests? You don't want the weld bead sitting too proud of the metal.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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Byron510
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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by Byron510 » 24 Sep 2009 12:18

okayfine wrote:Cut apart some of your test pieces to check for weld penetration. Are you beveling the edges of your butt-weld tests? You don't want the weld bead sitting too proud of the metal.
He's right - a proper weld set up is crucial to a good weld. This also includes weld preparation, which means all that mill scale (the hard black crap), needs to first be removed by a grinding wheel or blending wheel before starting anything. Then you bevel any joint over .040" to get the correct penetration without gobbling on loads of wire in order to get the heat in the part. Your weld beads look quite big so far, you likely did this to get the weld pool to “flow” out nicely.
When you get it right, you'll have a small bead that penetrates the material with an even deposit with no inclusions - then you have a good weld.

Julian is right - take a zip cut wheel through your welds and check penetration. You'll likely find that the above welds are just sitting on the surface.

But honestly, the best deal around is the one 510Rob posted some time ago - Miller sells a "student package" for $25 that come with books on Mig, Tig and other forms of welding to give you a basis to start on. It's a great package, and well worth the $25. Look up Miller, check out the bottom of this page:

http://www.millerwelds.com/resources/tools/

The Miller Student Package is a great buy for anyone who's never taken an official course, even if you have had a Mig or Tig welder for years, the books are well written and easy to understand and a bargain as far as I'm concerned.

Byron
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because the opposite never works.

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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by 510rob » 24 Sep 2009 12:20

haha - Byron, we were both thinking the exact same thing!

You are off to a good start - still in the preliminary stages, but it all looks the way it should look; a much better first step than a lot of people have taken.

Order yourself the "Miller Student Training Package" for $25. It will be the best money you ever spend on welding equipment. It includes their MIG book (at the same price as the MIG book alone) which is irreplaceable as a technical reference and education guide. Read this book because it explains everything about the process and all variables involved. You can practice along with the reading to reinforce the concepts.

link --> http://www.millerwelds.com/resources/tools/#training

GMAW (MIG) - Welding Publication $25.00
A comprehensive text on all aspects of the GMAW process. Hundreds of illustrations are used to help describe the fundamentals of GMAW, metal transfer modes, equipment, electrode wires, shielding gas, joint design and weld symbols, preparation, GMAW applications, spot, plug, slot welding, various welding positions, weld defects, troubleshooting, cost considerations and safety. Also included is a glossary of terms and tables to aid in selecting parameters.
142 pages (perfect bound) - 8 1/2" x 11"

OLDSCHOOLRICE
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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by OLDSCHOOLRICE » 24 Sep 2009 20:16

Thanks guys! I really appreciate all the input. I know I've got a long ways to go and am happy I have people like you guys to help me with what you can.

I've heard good things all over about the miller "student package". That is going to be my next investment.

As far as cleaning off the "scale", all my tools are at the shop where I work so I need to eventually buy a grinder of some sort for home use.

I haven't cut any of the pieces apart yet to check for penetration, but I'm pretty sure theres not much of it. I wasn't aware of the need for some sort of beveling.

Also, I'm sure it'll be in the package information, but I'm curious about hand movement while welding. What would necessitate the different hand movements (ie. just holding my hand still as I move along the joint, or moving in a zig-zag motion alont the joint)?

Thank you again.

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thisismatt
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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by thisismatt » 24 Sep 2009 21:01

I have one of these, and just bought another one last night so I can have two for different uses (grinder/cutting disc/flap disc/wire wheel). It's longer than many others, but I've used the one I have quite a bit and it's been great. I also use makita and bosch grinders almost daily and I really hate their triggers and trigger locks - the length of the B&D and trigger location make it easy/safe to start & lock running and then disengage to turn off. Plus, it's pretty friggin cheap. I use the norton flap discs primarily for any kind of grinding use...they simply remove material faster when you want it, and more delicately when you need it compared to a regular grinding disc. The only down side is they don't have material around the side edge so you can't really use them when you need to get into a space with the side of the disc. I get them at home depot...haven't really seen them cheaper anywhere else.

http://www.amazon.com/Black-Decker-G950 ... 782&sr=8-4
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OLDSCHOOLRICE
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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by OLDSCHOOLRICE » 25 Sep 2009 21:29

Wow! I didn't expect the grinder to be that cheap. I definitely appreciate the heads up on the comfort/ease of use for the different grinders, as I know how frustrating it can be to have a tool that's not user friendly.

Thank's thisismatt.

dat5102dr
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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by dat5102dr » 15 Jan 2012 18:53

CAn i get a recommendation?
simple
around 400

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two_68_510s
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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by two_68_510s » 15 Jan 2012 22:07

Miller Diversion 165 TIG unit, very user friendly controls(read amateur friendly), can weld paper thin aluminum to 1/4"+ steel plate.
220 only though, I like the idea of dual voltage input for versatility.
Joel

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dat5102dr
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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by dat5102dr » 16 Jan 2012 10:20

thanks
ill look it up

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okayfine
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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by okayfine » 16 Jan 2012 15:33

While a nice unit, the Miller seems to bust the indicated budget by some ways.

Mr. 2dr, once again we must ask you for more information. What are you looking to weld? Does the $400 budget include everything, or just the machine? Have you ever welded before?

Assuming the answers to those questions given your past history, you're going to want a bit more money (not a lot, $600 total should get you everything). Search for used welders on CL. Lincoln or Miller 120V buzz boxes. Those are MIG machines. You want a setup with a helmet and gas bottle. They are out there.

You can cheap-out on it if you're only using it for a couple things. Eastwood has a MIG for such use. The brand name Lincoln or Miller will last a long, long time and will be a more capable machine. You DO NOT want a Harbor Freight welder.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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two_68_510s
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Re: Recommendations on a welder

Post by two_68_510s » 17 Jan 2012 22:59

"$400 budget"
missed that.... :oops:
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'95 240SX
74 Jensen Healey

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