"The Shed"

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RMS
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Re: "The Shed"

Postby RMS » 05 Apr 2016 19:17

throw up a few 2x4s on the inside, cut it in half with a chainsaw, winch on trailer.
two_68_510s wrote:I guess our donkeys are quicker then your sled dogs!

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Re: "The Shed"

Postby Byron510 » 05 Apr 2016 22:26

greenthumb wrote:Looks great Byron. I'd have been sweating bullets cutting 1 1/2" deep with your heating lines down there!


Funny you mention that Henk...I just went out and checked - I cut 1" deep control lines.

My reason for being smug and feeling safe about cutting the control lines. When I set up the laser level, I had just over an inch of deviation from the high to low spot, so I ordered a full extra inch on concrete on the pad to start off with. So my highest spot on the floor would be exactly 5" deep. The rebar (11mm) was stationed at 1 1/2" off the foam insulation at it's cenertline. Add a piece of rebar on top of this and we are at 17mm or 11/16" + 1 1/2" = 2 3/16" plus 1/2" diameter water tubing and I'm at 2 11/16" off the insulation. Lets say the water hose could float up another 1/2" and we are at 3 3/16" absolute max. With a 1" depth cut, that should give me a minimum of 13/16" between my cut and the hose, but in all reality, it was 1/2 to 1 1/2" more that that.

However... to be sure.. the system was kept under pressure, and you can be damned sure I was looking over at that pressure gauge... a lot...many times.. each time physically cringing!
Gauge still shows only a couple pounds drop since 3 weeks before the concrete on got poured in the 3rd week of February; I feel good :D

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Re: "The Shed"

Postby Three B's Racing » 06 Apr 2016 06:06

When I built my garage 26'x32' two story in 1990 my contractor didn't put down any cement floor sealer or cut any lines. Today 26 years later my floor is as good as the day it was poured. So I'm wondering why you needed all that floor cutting sealing work, is it just where we live in terms of weather? My floors design the contractor said is called an Eskimo floor, designed to avoid any frost heaves, separation and is sure has.
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Re: "The Shed"

Postby Byron510 » 07 Apr 2016 10:05

Three B's Racing wrote: So I'm wondering why you needed all that floor cutting sealing work, is it just where we live in terms of weather? My floors design the contractor said is called an Eskimo floor, designed to avoid any frost heaves, separation and is sure has.


Overkill possibly?
We have all seen floors that did crack - a lot! the cuts are control lines for cracking - nothing more.

The sealing work is to protect the surface - we all spill stuff on the floor and concrete is more than willing to accept and soak it up, this just makes it a lot easier to clean up after a spill of any sort.

The densification makes the surface more impact and wear resistant, and I'm sure most of you have dropped something heavy on a concrete floor, the densification just helps the impact and abrasion from wearing the concrete down - like dragging a jack across the floor for instance.

Again, possibly overkill. But these steps are easy to take now when it's new and clean. Much harder to do later.

As for the control lines, when filling the cuts with polyurethane last night (more to come on this), I did see a small crack from one control line to the wall, which tells me it's working.

If you have a floor that 25 years old and no cracks - you had a damn good contractor! You are a lucky man.

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Re: "The Shed"

Postby Byron510 » 07 Apr 2016 10:11

Over the last two nights I have been working on filling the control lines I cut in the concrete slab. As noted earlier in the thread, I bought a polyurethane product meant for this job called NP-1.

Two nights ago I put down two small beads about a meter long each. Even with the tip of the calking tube cut as small as I could, it was difficult to lay the bead of urethane flat and smooth. I tried smoothing a 6" section with my finger, but quickly realized i was going to make a huge mess of the deal and promptly stopped this action!
Yesterday afternoon I took a razor blade to the fill points I had done the night before. I was able to cut the top off, but it still left a jagged surface that would trap dirt and some of it still stood proud of the surface. Still not correct.

Here is how it looked - the non taped part to the right...
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Re: "The Shed"

Postby Byron510 » 07 Apr 2016 10:19

So i called dear old dad and asked for advise - as fathers usually seem to have much of this.

And sure enough, he asked why I wasn't taping off the lines, smoothing with my finger and then pulling the tape off.....

So down to the hardware store I go, buy 4 rolls of 2" wide tape and proceeded to do just as dad suggested. And it worked awesome. Not fast, but the results are very good.

Pictures tell the story.

Place tape on both edges of the cut line;

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Fill the cut with the urethane, then go back and smooth over with your finger making the surface of the filler just below the surface of the concrete;

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Then peel back the tape right away.

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It took ma bout 2 1/2 hours to complete 90' of the cuts, and I completed this in 10' sections. I'm going to try to warm the tubes the next time I'm out there - that stuff is stiff to push out of the tubes with the calking gun.
I'm just over 1/3 done now, over the next couple of evenings I'll have this task completed and I can start shifting my crap out of the old shed,and prepare for demolition.

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Re: "The Shed"

Postby Three B's Racing » 07 Apr 2016 12:51

Byron510 wrote:
Three B's Racing wrote: So I'm wondering why you needed all that floor cutting sealing work, is it just where we live in terms of weather? My floors design the contractor said is called an Eskimo floor, designed to avoid any frost heaves, separation and is sure has.


Overkill possibly?
We have all seen floors that did crack - a lot! the cuts are control lines for cracking - nothing more.

The sealing work is to protect the surface - we all spill stuff on the floor and concrete is more than willing to accept and soak it up, this just makes it a lot easier to clean up after a spill of any sort.

The densification makes the surface more impact and wear resistant, and I'm sure most of you have dropped something heavy on a concrete floor, the densification just helps the impact and abrasion from wearing the concrete down - like dragging a jack across the floor for instance.

Again, possibly overkill. But these steps are easy to take now when it's new and clean. Much harder to do later.

As for the control lines, when filling the cuts with polyurethane last night (more to come on this), I did see a small crack from one control line to the wall, which tells me it's working.

If you have a floor that 25 years old and no cracks - you had a damn good contractor! You are a lucky man.

Byron


Over kill I think not , it is more protecting your investment if you ask me. Yeah my cement contractor WAS A 70 year old guy and his sons with some 40 year+ of experience. One thing he did do when all troweled up was he covered the whole floor with burlap bags and a lot of them then wet them down and told me to do the same the next day don't soak them simply wet them down in the morning as early as possible them remove the bags in the evening. I did get lucky!!
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Re: "The Shed"

Postby duke » 07 Apr 2016 15:27

Byron510 wrote:So i called dear old dad and asked for advise - as fathers usually seem to have much of this.


This made me smile. I can always count on my dad for advise, or at least an opinion, on pretty much any project that I'm doing.
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Re: "The Shed"

Postby Byron510 » 07 Apr 2016 16:35

duke wrote:
Byron510 wrote:So i called dear old dad and asked for advise - as fathers usually seem to have much of this.


This made me smile. I can always count on my dad for advise, or at least an opinion, on pretty much any project that I'm doing.


You know what made me laugh today is that I told dad that his idea worked great last night.
He laughed and said "Yeah, I'll have to try it next time myself. I just saw it on a building show some time in the past and thought it was a good idea"....

But he still bailed me out even if it wasn't his idea.

Yep, I'd be pretty much no where without dad on this project. In fact I wouldn't have even been into 510's had it not been for dad racing them when I was a kid.

Dad's do rock. Thanks Duke.

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Re: "The Shed"

Postby 510rob » 26 Jul 2016 10:41

Thu Apr 07, 2016 4:35 pm wrote:.

the realm needs an update!

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Re: "The Shed"

Postby Byron510 » 14 Sep 2016 17:27

Rob - you are right - this thread needs an update!

So this spring was financial recovery mode to say the least. That last $10k pour on the concrete floor including the concrete, 4 placers, a pumper truck , and the sealant took the last chunk out of my savings and then some, so from this point on it's pay as I go! I never did like debt much.

Anyways, I sidetrack myself on painting the back porch. Now this is totally unrelated to this thread for the exception of one thing, a neighbor Glen who has also recently again acquired a 510 in his life. Glen is a home reno guy and proprietor of No Problem Reno's, a man who takes extreme pride in his work and a guy who strives to do things right. The deck connection, he lent me his pressure washer, gave me many pointers on how to paint - better, helped me out for a day, and then had a look at what was done and where I was going onthe garage and simply said - call me when you are ready to move on this garage.


So thanks to Glen and hi-pressure washer, the deck took my about 7 weeks to complete in the evenings and weekends. But the looks great! Here is a before and afetr shot;

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So this took me to mid July. And yes the Shed remained untouched from April until this point. However I was able to sell a few sets of suspension brackets, did some other side work and saved the $5 necessary to purchase the metal siding and flashing to finish the outside of the Shed. This is how it looked at the lumber yard when it arrives, and after it was moved onto the ground at my place - god I love my trailer!

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Re: "The Shed"

Postby Byron510 » 14 Sep 2016 17:33

So Glen came over, made an assessment of the shop, shook his head at a few things and then we soldered on when i left off. Apparently i needed to do quite a bit brfroe tackling the siding!

Firstly was framing in and installing the air evacuation fan which I had bought (1600 CFM) and the lone window in the building. Glen did a great job at making this square in an otherwise not so squale stud job (yes I'm now quite worries bout the sheetrock, but I'll deal with that when I get there).

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And together we finished installing the soffits on the north side, the last side I had to do. the jig and skill saw worked awesome for this.

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Re: "The Shed"

Postby Byron510 » 15 Sep 2016 09:07

So now that all the framing is completed, and I believe all of the holes that I need to punch through the walls are complete (with exception of venting down the east wall at the soffits, which will be completed after I place the siding), it was time to focus back on the rain screen and foundation waterproofing. The arrows show the area of interest;

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The problem here was that the contractors involved in the concrete work had not seen insulated foundations in the past, and simply didn't know what to do with it - so they just carried on and back filled against it. Of course I wasn't sure of the next step either, which didn't help. So here we are back again, and now I have to dig it out. That dimple screen is not UV protected, and it needs to be covered. Not much an issue on the side shown above, but the back side needed to be taken down 3'. The other issue with the perimeter drain is that it wasn't draining. In fact the clay content around the building was so good that last winter through the rainy season I pulled off the sump and noted that very little water ever came out the drain tile.

So I felt I could correct two issues here. First, dig back and install flashing to cover the dimple rain screen membrane. Second, back fill with 3/4 crush gravel down to the drain tile so that the perimeter drain can actually work. Next step was to install the J channel that the siding would insert into at the top of the wall and remove the scaffolding that's been up there for 10 months. I have no shortage of lumber kicking around! Now of course more tools are required;

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This was available at Home Depot, on it's own trailer for $250/day. This saved my back for sure. having never driven a machine of any kind before, it took an hour or two to get used to it, but really after that I made up for it and things started moving. Glen dropped by, I took the shovel and he operated the machine for most of the deep side and we got it done in a few hours.

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This would have taken days by hand!

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Glen continued to be a source of inspiration, working as a pair sure beats working on your own! Thanks Glen.

That brings us up to date, hoping to start on the flashing in the next day or two, get some gravel delivered and then start back filling the perimeter with drain rock.
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Re: "The Shed"

Postby Byron510 » 15 Sep 2016 09:18

Little side note - made my son's year and turned him loose on the mini excavator, tore up the drive way with the skid steering and dug a couple holes - that was last week and he's still smiling! :-)

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Re: "The Shed"

Postby Chickenman » 15 Sep 2016 10:14

Luv the photos of your Son digging away. Read an interesting article years ago about the most satisfying jobs ( for men ) in the world. The top five included Fighter Pilots, Racing Car drivers and.... Heavy Equipment operators like Dozers and Diggers. Apparently we just never grow up... :mrgreen:


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