"The Shed"

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Byron510
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Re: "The Shed"

Post by Byron510 » 12 Aug 2015 12:22

Monte, to address you question – I believe we have a really solid material here to work with. On this back wall shot, you can clearly see where we left the surface fill, then top soil then into the clay for a solid 18”. There were small cedar trees above this very spot, and the roots just fanned out across the surface. At the front the excavator cut into the clay for only a few inches just to make sure it’s solid and to save on the material that needed to be removed.

Looks pretty good, I pick up forms and materials in the next couple of days.
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Re: "The Shed"

Post by Byron510 » 12 Aug 2015 12:36

Last night I worked well into the dark putting back the 4 fence panels I removed. That’s a bit more difficult to do on your own than taking them down if you are trying to get them level and square.. on lose ground... in the dark! I was literally using the LED on my cordless drill to view the bubble on the level - likely not the most efficient way to work. The far panel was raised 19" and the ground level behind the fence now matches my neighbour - where it was quite a drop previously. I will move the panels closer to the back of the yard to match the 4 I just raised once we start back filling, again matching my neighbors ground level.

The area along this fence will get torn up again as this will be the service corridor for water, sewage, power, gas and data lines. Storm will go down the side of the driveway as there needs to be a sump in the system. I'd love to bury a huge tank for collecting rain water for watering the lawn in the summer, but that's just a pipe dream really.

Here is a shot of the trailer and the wood we unearthed. There were 4 cedar stumps that I expected, but the rest was a bit of a surprise, along with the load of crap I took yesterday to the dump as it was all either painted or pressure treated, which rules out recycling.
I have to look into concrete guys now, it’s 170’ from the front yard, over the house to the rear footing. So that will take a special pumper truck.

Sure feels good to have something actually happening here.

Byron
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gooned
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Re: "The Shed"

Post by gooned » 12 Aug 2015 20:02

Byron510 wrote:
The area along this fence will get torn up again as this will be the service corridor for water, sewage, power, gas and data lines.

I have to look into concrete guys now, it’s 170’ from the front yard, over the house to the rear footing. So that will take a special pumper truck.

Sure feels good to have something actually happening here.

Byron
Let me know if you want to get some conduit from us at work, it comes in 20' sticks though.

Line pump, you don't have that tall a wall anywhere and the size of truck to reach will be massive. :shock:

Nice progress, stay it...winters coming!

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Re: "The Shed"

Post by Byron510 » 12 Aug 2015 20:52

I know winter is coming....

It was interesting talking to various concrete guys this week, the difference between 56 meter reach truck and a line pump truck is not very much, because with line pumper you need one more guy to haul the concrete around. So the labour offsets the cheaper truck. Also clean up of the concrete is much more on a line pump as each hose needs to be cleaned where boom pump truck can pull all but one meter back into the truck and I won't have to dispose of it.
Things I hadn't previously considered. The surveyor will be in Friday to drop the pins on the corners of the foundation, forms will go up by Wednesday and we could have concrete by Thursday or Friday at this point.
I'm trying to weigh the benefits of pouring the slab before or after the framing and roof is on. The concrete guys like it done before because they simply can see more and do a better job. The framing contractor like is after because with no slab in place he can stake his wall jacks easier for standing up the sheeted walls. I still am undecided.
Thanks Jason, we had no room to place the dirt for the service trench, so it will be done after the backfilling of the forms is finished and I'll have to haul out some dirt. I also need some grading of the driveway done at that time as well.

I am happy to see progress.

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Re: "The Shed"

Post by McShagger510 » 13 Aug 2015 17:49

Good beginnings Byron!

James
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Re: "The Shed"

Post by two_68_510s » 13 Aug 2015 22:46

This is fun! Thanks for sharing all the details, it is very cool. That clay looks like sturdy stuff. I take it you don't get a hard freeze there? I mean not like back east.
I remember when the boss had a project, ground up like this, they liked to plant the super there in a trailer for a few days before breaking ground, and kept him there. So many details, they wanted the continuity. Some folks would bounce a super from project to project, but it was short sighted. More than one delay happened as a result of no super in site, and avoiding those delays could easily pay the extra salary! Once a sub sees a chance to go to another more pressing job, they will run! If it was small job (10-25,000 square feet) they used a newer guy to get their feet wet.
I liked to watch it go up as a facilities manager, so I had an intimate knowledge of the systems after it was up and running.

Living there is perfect, I can see you now walking the site, thinking, rubbing your chin!! Good ideas come from that!
Again thanks for sharing.
Joel

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Re: "The Shed"

Post by Byron510 » 13 Aug 2015 23:24

You know it Joel! I have walked many laps around this foundation base already - and it's only been there for a day! Freezing is not an issue on this side of the coastal mountains. Anywhere else in Canada and I would have footing 4’ down minimum due to frost. Even in the coldest winters I have never seen frost in Vancouver lower than 6-8”. We just deal (normally) with a copious amount of rain here in the Pacific Northwest 

The surveyors drop the four corner foundation pins tomorrow, and extra costs but well worth it as there will be no issues with building placement within the property for the city. Then the surveyors come back and sign off on the forms just before pouring the concrete. Right now I'm debating the multitude of concrete guys available - services and prices vary widely. Hard to know, but I’ll be checking into their other projects. I have one concrete guy guaranteeing 1/8" deviation on the slab. That's as low as I have seen so far.

Well I was in for minor surgery today, and was sedated so I had to take the day off - no driving allowed. But I'm all good to go for tomorrow. I have a load of stumps to get rid of and a raiser to build for the trailer before I go get the wood and steel for the footings.
Then the forms themselves will be delivered - likely on Monday. These will be delivered by a 5 ton to my place, I’ll transfer them onto the trailer to get in the back yard. All going well, the forms are in place by Wednesday, then get signed off by the surveyor and it's poured by Friday.

Strip the forms the following week and start thinking about drainage, a sump and connecting to storm drain. Then backfilling before we start framing and getting the trusses in place and sheet the roof. Roofer still needs to be lined up (likely torch on because it's a 1/4 in 12 pitch and I don’t think I have an option). Then I have to think about the slab, more rebar, sand and a whole lot of tamping and watering going on. Somewhere along the way after back filling is done and the excess dirt hauled away, I need to re-contour the driveway, make a new gate and get the service trench in place. (Power, gas, water, sewage, data) and various trades inspections along the way.

See how it goes next week, I'll keep you posted.

Byron
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Re: "The Shed"

Post by 510wizard » 14 Aug 2015 07:40

Are you doing the foundation yourself ? Imho it's one of the most critical jobs in the whole construction, if it's not right you'll be fighting the rest of the job the whole rest of the way. Then there is the problem with form blowouts and/or form movement. Don't ever underestimate the force of wet concrete on the forms.

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Re: "The Shed"

Post by James » 14 Aug 2015 08:44

^^ Agreed ^^
You will never hear a framer swear more than if he is working over a poorly done foundation. That being said - not all concrete guys are critical themselves. Square and level are the critical pieces…..

Forms are critical as well. I had done plans for some friends of mine who were expanding a room under their house, which required a 10' retaining wall. Mid pour the form failed - and the contractor was able to call in favors from everyone he knew in town to show up and clean up the mess. Granted your situation is not the same as this, but the formwork can still move/flex which can make things tougher as you go forward.

I am envious of the space on your lot. The shop will be very cool - as will the yard. Keep on it!
Finished is better than perfect......

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Re: "The Shed"

Post by Byron510 » 14 Aug 2015 17:29

Monte and James,

I have definitely left the forms to those that know :-)
My contractor who I think I will let frame the shop is doing the footings and the forms. The form rental place drops them off on Monday.

So between a guy who knows forming, and the fact that the lot has been properly surveyed, and an excavation contractor who works with both of the above guys well - I think my foundation is set. I was going to frame the shop with the assistance of my father and a number of helping hands that have volunteered, but my contractor has thrown me a pretty awesome price so I might just take it. That decision has not been made, as it's a few weeks out.
But to answer you both, I have left the footings and forms to guys who know, and I agree with you both - as Joel mentioned earlier - on a 30X45 foot pour, I'd think things can go sideways - quickly if you don't know what you are doing.

Byron
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Re: "The Shed"

Post by 510wizard » 15 Aug 2015 07:53

Good to hear on not doing it yourself. And when things go sideways like a form blowout it's not like can go and have a cup of coffee while you regroup. Whats good about the contractor doing both is that if the footings are not right, he'll be the one fighting the framing. Because of this, he will spend the extra time to get the foundation right.

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Re: "The Shed"

Post by Byron510 » 15 Aug 2015 09:50

Agreed Monte.
And James – this property has exactly this building in mind when I bought it in January – specifically this shop needed to be built as I have the machinery already – I was just happy to get both the lot and a decent house in one spot close to a school and transit for the kids and wife. The only downfall to the whole program has been the back yard access being narrowed 1.5 feet from the original plan after I had the surveying done.
The framing is still up in the air as to who will do it. I got a number from the contractor yesterday, around $10k to frame it. Agreed it will be done in three weeks, but $10k buys a lot of the internal electrical bits I need to get my machines going.

I have had an offer from a number of good friends to help me out on the framing, a couple of them are really accomplished carpenters/framers. If that help is available, along with a number of good hands for grunt work, maybe a good ole Mormon style barn raising day would be a good plan as well. A few of those good friends are here on this site, and a few more lurk for fun occasionally.

But not putting the cart before the horse, we'll get the footings and foundation in, drainage done, services in and then start the framing. I just have to decide if the slab gets put in before or after the framing gets completed.

Byron
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Re: "The Shed"

Post by iceD » 16 Aug 2015 07:10

but $10k buys a lot of the internal electrical bits

With some left over for beer

ice D

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Re: "The Shed"

Post by Byron510 » 16 Aug 2015 07:14

I fully agree Derek/

That $10K put into my own sweat equity would put a good start on the 3Ph converter I need for the lathe/mill and some copper wire as well.
:wink:

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Re: "The Shed"

Post by Byron510 » 16 Aug 2015 07:52

Yesterday I picked up the 8k lb jack for the trailer which was on the order/build sheet but got missed when the trailer was custom fabricated. I bought the trailer through Kitt Equipment out in Chilliwack, good guys to deal with overall. It’s the second car trailer we have bought though them.

When I took the 2k lb jack off, it had already bent and distorted the hitch plate which is what these types usually do - this is why I ordered the real jack in the first place! The distortion is clearly visible in photo 226 below, and I had only hauled 2 loads on the trailer at this point. Just under-engineered right from the start. I simply welded on the new jack to an existing member right behind the hitch mount. I was going to add some fancy bracing, but decided that I would simply jack this set up and see what would happen. I was able to lift the back axel of the Xterra off the ground with very little cranking effort – no issues. I call the mounting QC’d and signed off.
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