The Datsun 510 Wheel and Tire FAQ

Suspension, including wheel, tire and brake.
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okayfine
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The Datsun 510 Wheel and Tire FAQ

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 12:18

Editor's Note: I talked with Kurt Hafer, of Kurt Hafer's Wheel FAQ, recently about supplying the files for his website so I could post them here on The Realm. He was happy to do so. The web server the original Wheel FAQ (and Subaru diff FAQ) has been hosted on comes and goes, but beyond that I'd like to bring the Wheel FAQ up to date.

That means work, but that effort has to come from The Realm as a whole. For this FAQ to be useful, it has to contain correct, up-to-date information on what wheels fit and what mods are required to make them fit. The FAQ that follows will mirror the original Wheel FAQ; the additions The Realm members supply will be added to the specific (14", 15", etc.) posts that follow.

Now...it's up to all of us at The Realm to fill in the wheels we have personally used on our 510s.

Since that can involve a wide range of wheels, suspension parts, ride heights, etc., I'd also like to propose this format, similar to what was originally used by Kurt:

Post Subject: Change the subject line of your post to match the brand/model of your rim.
Wheel Size: - Keep this as a 15x7 (nnxn) format so people can search 15x7 since The Realm search won't allow '15 x 7' being it is too short.
Source/Brand: - Brand and model are more important than source, since Google allows much easier searching than we had back in the day. However, the source you used and the price you paid, if bought new, would be useful information.
Offset / Backspacing: Very important, for obvious reasons.
Weight: Self evident.
Tire Size: Please list the tire make/model and size that you used with the rim you are adding. Tire widths vary across manufacturers for a given size, but with that information anyone can look up the vital measurements.

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: The most important part of your submission. Here, please detail your suspension setup (stock struts, 280ZX front struts, S12 struts, etc.), ride height (measured at the front and rear rocker flat to ground), body modifications (rolled fenders, minitub, flares, etc.), and any other modifications necessary (notched rear a-arms) that are required to fit these wheels to another 510.

Pictures are also very welcome; wheel-only and/or side profiles work well.

--------------------------

Introduction:

Ever since I first became hooked on Datsun 510s, I've wanted a source to help me know what wheels and tires fit these cars. Rex Jennett did a nice job doing this in the 1980s, publishing 510 wheel fitments in his UFO newsletter. Now that RWD cars are becoming scarce, and 13" wheels even scarcer, I thought I'd take a stab at this FAQ, picking up where Rex left off. Please note that this FAQ is an ever-changing information source, combining information and personal experiences from many 510 owners over the years. As such, I would like it to only contain accurate information, but I can make no guarantees about wheels that I haven't actually placed on a 510 myself. Each 510 is also different, so a wheel/tire combination that worked on one 510 may not work on another. At least it gives you a place to start. Please let me know of your own wheel and tire fitment experiences so I may add them to the information below.

What We All Started With:

The 1968-73 Datsun 510's came from the factory with 13" x 4" or 13" x 4.5" steel wheels with 5.60-13 bias ply tires. The 510 has a four bolt wheel with a 4-1/2 inch (or 114.3mm) bolt circle, measured from center of one hole/stud to the center of the hole/stud across from it. Lugnuts are 12mm x 1.25 RH threaded. Stock backspacing is 3 and 15/16 inches. Any "bolt-on" replacement wheel should have this bolt pattern (often referred to as 4 by 4 1/2) and roughly this backspacing. Backspacing and offset will be further explained below.

Wheel Options:

Choosing wheels for your 510 involves many factors. How much can you afford to spend? What do you want your new wheels to help your 510 do? Are you after race-car handling or do you want a smooth around-town ride? Do you want steel or aluminum alloy wheels? What size wheels would you like? What "look" wheel would you like to see on your 510? Is your 510 stock, lowered, or flared? What kind of tires do you want to use? Finally, what wheels are available in your area? Other 510 owners are invaluable sources of both fitment information and wheels for sale.

Stock Steel Wheels with the proper bolt circle and backspacing came on many RWD Datsuns/Nissans, Toyotas, etc., in a variety of diameters from 13" to 16", and can be had from salvage yards for as little as $5 per wheel. These often weigh less than a factory alloy wheel. Good choice for a stealth look, or if you're on a tight budget.
Stock Aluminum Alloy Wheels are available from many cars that conveniently fit 510s. These used factory "take-off" wheels (so called because new car owners have them taken off when the car is brand new in order to add their own wheel choice) can be purchased at salvage yards or from other 510 owners for as little as $20 each or from take-off wheel dealers for $100+ each depending on the wheel. A good place to start is to look at the wheels that came on the Z-cars and RWD mid-'80s Toyotas.
New Aftermarket Aluminum Alloy Wheels range from $40 inexpensive no-name wheels to expensive $600+ all-out super-light, race-only forged magnesium alloy wheels. These are getting harder to find for 510s because not many cars are now RWD. Ask for fitments for the older Z cars, as these should fit the 510. Of course, if you have enough money, you can get anything custom-built to your specifications.
At the end of this FAQ I've compiled a detailed list of wheels that are known to fit the 510 as well as wheels that have the same bolt circle and may be worth trying for fitment on the 510. See the Wheel Chart below for specifics.

Wheel and Tire Size Options:

You can choose to shod your 510 with wheels ranging from 13" to 17" in diameter, but there are some things you should know about how the various wheel and tire sizes affect your 510. A good place to start is by explaining the "Plus-zero", "Plus-one", "Plus-two", etc. wheel fitment concept. Ideally, you'd like to try to keep the overall outside tire diameter as close to stock as possible (within +/- .04 inches) so that your speedometer and odometer readings and gear ratios are minimally affected by your new wheels and tires. Maintaining a constant outside diameter also better assures that your new setup will clear all suspension parts, fender lips, etc. (but there are no guarantees). Generally, as you go up a size in "Plus-one", "Plus-two", "Plus-three", etc, you:

-Add one inch to the wheel diameter
-Add 20mm to the tire section width
-Subtract 10 from the sidewall aspect ratio of the stock tire size
-Add 0.5" to the rim width.

plus_size.jpeg
Graphic designed by Mark Sutton, used with permission of Discount Tire Co.
plus_size.jpeg (73.37 KiB) Viewed 42635 times


"Plus-Zero" means using the same diameter wheel and tire the car came with from the factory, which in the case of the 510 is a 13" wheel. You can use a wider wheel and tire, however. The bias ply tires that came stock on a 510 had different sizing designations from today's radials, but a stock 510 tire was about a 155/78-13 or 165/78-13 on a 4" or 4.5" wide wheel, depending on model year. Many 510 owners are happy with 13" wheels that are 5.5", 6" or 7" wide on their stock-fendered 510s. Tire sizes that work well are 175/70-13, 185/70-13, 185/60-13, 205/60-13 and 215/50-13 -- but these may not be the same diameter as a stock tire.
"Plus-One" means going up in diameter one size from stock, so in the case of the 510, is a 14" wheel. Many Z-car wheels are 14 x 6". A 185/70-14 tire is a true "Plus-one", but 185/65-14, 185/60-14 and 195/60-14 sizes also seem to work well on 510s.
"Plus-Two" means going up two sizes in diameter from stock, resulting in a 15" wheel. The 280ZX turbo and 200SX and 300Z as well as the Altima come with this size wheel. 15 x 6" or 15 x 7" can fit under a stock fendered 510. A true "Plus-two" fitment would suggest a 205/60-15size tire, but many 510 owners find a 195/50-15 or 205/50-15 fits better.
"Plus-Three" means using a 16" wheel, like the late-model 300ZX (wheel is 5-bolt, so not a direct bolt-on). Tire size would be about a 225/50-16 on a 6", 6.5" or 7" wide rim. By now, you should get the idea of how this works.
So why or why not choose to go to a larger diameter wheel? First, not many performance tires are still available in 13" sizes these days, as not many performance cars come with 13" wheels. Finding 13" wheels is also more difficult, especially if you want something wider than 13" x 5.5". It is far easier to find performance 14", 15", and 16" wheels and tires, and they are available in a much larger variety of widths. Larger wheels may also be needed to give you additional clearance around those huge vented front brakes you've just installed into your 510. The shorter sidewall of these larger tires flex less, giving more precise responses to the driver's steering inputs, albeit at the expense of ride comfort (tire sidewalls do act as springs), and the wider tire gives a larger contact patch (footprint) for better lateral stability. But there are prices to pay for this madness. As you go to larger wheel and tires, you generally have to spend more for a given wheel and tire. As an example, a nice 13" alloy wheel might be $150, and a performance tire another $75. So I now have just spent $900 on my new wheel/tire combination. Jump up to a 15" wheel and the alloy wheel is now $200 and the same performance tire is now $120, making my setup now set me back $1280. But wait, there's more to a larger wheel/tire combination . . . more weight that is!

Bigger is Not Always Better:

As wheel and tire sizes increase, so does wheel and tire weight. This can have a drastic effect on the performance of low horsepower cars like the 510, even if the wider wheel and tire do give you more stick. As a general rule, you want to keep your rotating mass to a minimum (when I raced bicycles, we used to say that an saving an ounce on the wheels was like taking a pound off the bicycle frame). The inertia to get these rotating masses (called wheels and tires) moving can be compared to having a heavy or a light flywheel attached to the motor in your 510. A heavy flywheel is harder to get up to speed, not to mention harder to slow down. Specifically, you not only want to keep the total rotating mass down, but you want to keep the mass you have as near the center of the wheel as possible. Given the choice between two wheels of equal weight, the wheel with less rim mass will perform better, but the rim might also be more susceptible to pothole damage. Tires, since they surround the entire wheel, are an even more important place to shed weight. Same-size tires can vary significantly in weight by brand. A Hoosier radial race tire weighs 11 lbs, while their BFG counterparts in the same size weigh 18 lbs each. When choosing your wheels and tires, keep your eye on the scales. Don't believe hearsay wheel weights. I have tried to post accurate wheel weights in the wheel chart, but you really need to weigh the wheels and tires yourself. Many aftermarket aluminum alloy wheels weigh more than their stock steel counterparts in the same size!

In a September 1998 Sport Compact Car Magazine article, the authors changed their Honda Civic Si from stock 14" steel wheels to new 17" alloy monsters, but reported that the car lost some of its zip. The stock wheel/tire combination weighed 34 lbs, while their 17" O.Z. wheels and Nitto tire combination weighed in at 43 lbs each. When they put the car on the dyno with the stock wheels, they saw 113.5 peak real wheel horsepower. With the 17" combo and NO OTHER CHANGES, they saw 107.9 peak real wheel horsepower, a drop of 5.6 hp just from using larger and heavier wheels which "only" added a total of 36 lbs to the car's 2000+ lb curb weight. Now you know why my D street-prepared autocross 510 runs on 13" wheels with 185/60-13 tires!

Offset and Backspacing Made Simple:

This is an area that can easily cause much confusion. While these terms are often used interchangeably, they are not the same. Further confusing all of this is the fact that rim width is the distance between the rim flanges (where the tire bead contacts the rim), so that the actual wheel width from edge to edge is 1.0" greater that the stated wheel width, making a 6.0" rim actually measure 7.0" wide at it's widest point.

wheel_offset.jpeg
Graphic designed by Mark Sutton, used with permission of Discount Tire Co.
(Outside face of wheel is towards your Right)
wheel_offset.jpeg (61.26 KiB) Viewed 42635 times


Backspacing refers to the distance from the mounting surface of the wheel (where it contacts the hub) to the back side (inwards-facing) edge of the rim. The easiest way to measure this is by placing a bare wheel on the floor upside down. Place a straight-edge across the wheel, then use a ruler to measure the distance from the bottom of the straight edge to the mounting surface of the rim. Stock 510 wheels have about 4" of backspacing, and this is a good measurement to shoot for. You can try to measure backspacing with a tire mounted on the wheel, but you will have to adjust your measurement if the tire sidewall extends beyond the rim.
Offset refers to how much the hub mounting surface of the wheel is offset from the wheel's center, usually given in millimeters. Wheels can be positive or negative offset. Datsun 510s like anywhere from zero to up to +25mm of offset. To get this measurement requires a bit of basic math. First measure overall wheel width from the outside edges of the wheel lips, then divide this measurement in half. Next measure the backspacing as above. A 7" wide wheel is actually 8" wide from wheel lip to wheel lip. If the hub mounting surface were exactly in the center of the wheel, it would have zero offset. It would also have 4" backspacing. Many of the 13" x 7" American Racing Libre wheels are just like this. If the backspacing on this wheel were 3", then the wheel offset would be +25mm (1 inch = 25.4 mm). Panasport made 13" x 6" wheels for the 510 in both +9mm and +15mm offsets, and both fit fine, so you don't need to be super-precise with these measurements. As wheel diameter and width increase, you can usually get away with a bit more positive offset, as the 15" and 16" Panasports are +22mm offset. Most FWD cars use wheels that range between +30mm to +45mm offset.
Note: Using improperly spaced wheels may require the use of wheel spacers between the hub and wheel mounting surface for proper fitment, but keep in mind that this may require longer wheel studs. Furthermore, wheels that have significantly less backspacing or negative offset than stock (i.e. deep-dish wheels that "stick out") can put extreme stresses on wheel bearings and suspension components. These wheels may also increase steering wheel kick-back. Of course it is always better to get wheels that fit correctly, and not have to use spacers at all.

A Note About Lug Nuts:

You can quickly ruin a new set of wheels by using the wrong lug nuts. Even worse would be to lose a wheel while driving and have an accident, harming your 510, yourself, and/or others. Don't let this happen.

The 510 came with 12mm x 1.25 RH threaded wheel studs and standard tapered seat steel lug nuts. For any stock steel wheel or aluminum wheel using tapered seats, you can use the stock lug nuts. For any Datsun/Nissan "take-off" aluminum wheel you MUST use the special short-shank Nissan lug nuts and washers or you will RUIN your wheels. These can be purchased from your Nissan dealer (Nissan Part # 40224-R4670), and list for $7.65 each! I have yet to find any cheaper sources for this lug nut, other than salvage yards. Almost every Datsun/Nissan factory alloy wheel uses these, so they're not that hard to find. Many aluminum wheels have straight-sided holes that need square-shanked lug nuts with washers. Make sure the lug nut shank is not too long by test fitting it through the wheel hole and seeing that it doesn't protrude through the hole all the way to the hub mounting surface.

Finally, a note about aftermarket lug nut quality. You generally get what you pay for. The aftermarket lug nuts found at Murray's, Trak Auto, AutoZone, Kragen, etc. are usually of poor quality. Summit Racing sells McGard lugnuts for $7.50 per set of 4, and sells their Summit house brand lug nuts for even less. I like the McGard quality. Their products have nice plating, a nice fit, and they have a McGard Web Page that lists all of their products so I can find exactly the lug nut I need. Their locking lug nuts are also pretty nice. I also like to apply a bit of anti-seize compound to every wheel stud to keep the rust away. K-Speed America (see wheel/tire sources section below) sells nice sets of 16 tapered lug nuts for $16 a set. I torque my wheels by hand as hard as I can with the factory lug nut wrench. A torque wrench is even better, especially if you race your 510. Tire Rack recommends 70 ft-lbs.

If your spare takes different lug nuts than your other wheels, make sure you keep a set of the 4 lug nuts that work with your spare in your trunk so you won't be stranded next time you have a flat.

Deciphering Tire Sidewalls:

Before buying new tires, take a minute to learn what all those numbers and letters on the tire sidewall mean:

Tire Size: Let's say, for example, we have a P185/60-R13 tire. The "P" indicates this is a passenger car tire. Many times this is omitted (LT = Light Truck tire). The first number is the Section Width of the tire in millimeters, measured from sidewall to sidewall of a fully-inflated tire without any load placed on it. For a 185/60-13 tire, the width is 185mm or 7.28" (to convert to inches, divide by 25.4). It is important to note that this is not the tread width of the tire at the road surface. The second number is the Aspect Ratio, a ratio of sidewall height to tire width (a percentage of the section width). The tire above is 7.28" wide, so we multiply by the aspect ratio to find the height of one sidewall. In this case, 185 x 0.60 = 111mm (or 7.28" x 0.60 = 4.36"). The "R" means this is a radial tire. The last number is the Diameter of the wheel in inches. When switching to larger diameter wheels, try to keep the tire outside diameter the same as the car's stock tire to avoid problems with speedometer and odometer calibration and changing overall gear ratios.

To calculate the outside diameter of a tire: Take the sidewall height and multiply by 2, (remember that the diameter is made up of 2 sidewalls, one above the wheel and the one below the wheel) and add the diameter of the wheel to get your answer.
For example: 185/60-14: 185mm x .60 = 111mm x 2 = 222mm + 355.6mm (14") = 577.6mm or 22.74" diameter.

Note: When mounted on a wider than designed wheel, tire section width increases by 0.2"(5mm) for every 0.5" increase in rim width. This would make a 185mm wide tire mounted on a 7.5" rim have a section width of 190mm. A general rule of thumb for a high-performance tire is a rim width that is 85-90% as wide as the tread of the tire (not tire section width).

Speed Rating: The maximum safe top speed of a tire under perfect conditions is given as a letter in part of the tire size designation. If the tire says 185/60R14 85H or 185/60HR14 on the sidewall, the R indicates it is a radial tire, and the H means it is speed rated up to 130mph. Common speed ratings are:

Q=99 MPH, 160km/h U=124 MPH, 200km/h W=168 MPH, 270km/h
S=112 MPH, 180km/h H=130 MPH, 210km/h Y=186 MPH, 300km/h
T=118 MPH, 190km/h V=149 MPH, 240km/h Z=149+ MPH, 240+ km/h

Treadwear, Traction, Temperature, & Load: The Department of Transportation requires each manufacturer to grade its tires under the Uniform Tire Quality Grade (UTQG) labeling system to establish ratings for treadwear, traction, and temperature resistance. These tests are conducted independently by each manufacturer following government guidelines to assign values that represent a comparison between the tested tire and a control tire. This is designed to tell the consumer how long a tire will last, the distance needed to stop, and how quickly the tire heats up. Since each tire manufacturer interprets their tests in their own manner, this makes comparing two tires from different manufacturers virtually impossible, so take these ratings as only a very rough guide. While traction and temperature resistance ratings represent specific performance levels, the treadwear ratings are assigned by the manufacturers following field testing and are most accurate when comparing tires of the samebrand.

Treadwear: Treadwear receives a comparative rating based on wear rate of the the tire in field testing following a government specified course. For example, a tire grade of 150 wears 1.5 times longer than a tire graded 100. The tested tires are only worn down part way, so this rating can't really say anything about total tire tread life. Actual performance of the tire can vary significantly depending on conditions, driving habits, care, road characteristics, and climate, so take these ratings with a grain of salt. Ratings are valid for comparison of tires made by the same manufacturer, but not for tires made by different manufacturers. DOT-approved auto-x competition tires typically have treadwear ratings from 0 to 60. Ultra sticky high performance street tires have ratings in the 120 to 180 range. Touring tires can have treadwear ratings above 400.

Traction: Straight-line wet braking traction is represented by a grade of A, B, or C, with A being the highest rating. In 1997 a new top rating of "AA" was introduced to indicate even greater wet braking traction. However, due to its newness, this grade will probably be applied initially to new tire lines as they are introduced and later to existing lines which excel in wet braking, but had been limited to the previous top grade of "A". Traction grades do not indicate wet cornering ability.

Temperature: Temperature resistance is graded A, B or C, with A being the highest rating. It represents the tire's resistance to the heat generated by running at high speed. Grade C is the minimum level of performance for all passenger car tires as set under Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards. This grade is established for a tire that is properly inflated and not overloaded. Some competition auto-x tires are designed to have a B or C rating so that they heat up enough to reach full operating temperature early on in an auto-x course.

Load Ratings: Many tires come with a service description added on the end of the tire size. These service descriptions contain a number, which is the Load Index, and a letter which indicates the speed rating. The load index represents the maximum load each tire is designed to support. Because the maximum tire load capacity is branded on the tire's sidewall, the Load Index is used as a quick reference. Multiply the tire load rating by 4 to get the maximum carrying capacity of the tires. Never use a load rating below that specified by the car's manufacturer. See the tire Load Chart for specifics. (Graphic designed by Mark Sutton, used with permission of Discount Tire Co.)

Date Code: Every tire has string of numbers and letters molded into the sidewall that tell the tire serial number, DOT compliance code, and when the tire was made. This information is usually found near the rim, and often has a flat-head screw imprint both before and after it, as the information is stamped into a plate that is screwed into the tire mold. Look at the last three numbers in the code to get the week of manufacture and the year. If the last three numbers were 127, this would mean the tire was made the in the 12th week of 1997 (or 1987, for that matter). Why would you want to know this? Well, if you're buying a car and the owner says they just put on new tires, but they don't look that new, check the date code. Be aware that you can buy new tires that may have been sitting in a warehouse for a few years, but the date code is usually less than 2 years old for new tires.

Competition Tires: For those interested in a street-legal tire that gives near-racing slick grip, consider a set of DOT legal competition tires. These are not for winter use, may not work well in the rain, and often wear out in 5,000 - 10,000 miles (or less), but their performance capabilities will make you smile. Treadwear ratings (for what they're worth) will range from 0 to 60. Choices include both road-racing and auto-x tires, with the auto-x tires often having a softer compound and a carcass that heats up faster than a road racing tire. Popular choices among autocrossers and road-racers include the BFG R1 (and upcoming BFG G-force), Yokohama A008RSII, Yokohama AS032, Toyo Proxes, Kumho V-700, and Hoosier AS302/RS302. To makes these tires last longer, it is important to heat them up to full operating temperature the FIRST time they are used, and then let them cool and rest for at least 24 hours to "cure" the rubber compound. Tires treated this way can last twice as long as non-heat cured tires. The Yokohama A008RS-II tires (but not the A008RS) can also be flipped on the rim when the outside tread starts to wear as a way to increase the useful life of the tire. Looks funny, but works.

Snow Tires: For 510 owners lucky enough to live where there is snow and who wish to continue driving, snow tires are a must. Different rules apply for snow tires. The 510 is a light car, which means it has a tendency to ride on the snow, and not through it, to make contact with the road surface. When deciding on the proper snow tire, you generally want the narrowest tire possible so that the contact patch has the most weight per square inch on it, making it more likely to cut throught the snow and contact the road surface. You also want snow tires on all four wheels, as you need your 510 to stop and go as well as turn. Most 510 owners recommend 13" wheels, as this allows maximum body clearance should you need to install tire chains. Wheels between 4" and 5" wide with a 165/78-13 snow tire are about right. Other owners report good success with 14" wheels and a similarly narrow tire. Stock steel wheels from 510s, HL510s, any older RWD Datsuns (including Z-cars), or even RWD toyotas make ideal snow tire wheels. High quality snow tires are also a must. Bridgestone Blizzaks, Nokian Hakkapeliitta, or Gislaved tires all work well, and can be studded if need be. These tires may be ordered from Discount Tire, Tire Rack, Greer Enterprises in Wisconsin (414) 545-2296 or G&G Service in Wisconsin (414) 628-1716.

Fenders -- To Flare or Not to Flare:

Stock-bodied 510s will accept a huge variety of wheels, but sometimes a little extra clearance is needed, especially if your 510 suspension has been severely lowered. The most common interference is the rear wheel well inner fender lips. An easy solution is to "roll" these fender lips upward to give an extra 1/2" of clearance. This is easily accomplished with a baseball bat and a friend. One person wedges the baseball bat between the rear tire and the fender lip at either the front or rear of the wheel well while the other person SLOWLY drives the car a few feet forward or backward, causing the baseball bat to be pulled upward between the wheel opening and the tire. By varying both the angle of the bat and the thickness of the bat, you can vary the amount of flattening. It's best to take it slow, carefully bending the inner fender lip up so that after 5 or 10 passes, the inner lip is bent up against the inside of the rear fender. Repeat the process on the other side. Done properly, you should have no change in the outward appearance of your fenders. The Integra Web Page has photos of this procedure being performed on an Integra.

Other owners have wanted a more aggressive look to their 510 or have needed more room under their fenders so that they can mount wider tires. In this case, you can choose between the classic BRE-style bubble flares or the IMSA Box-style flares. There are many companies that make fibreglass fenders and flares for 510s, like QuickSkins or Japco Raceglass. You can also have a body shop custom-make steel flares for your 510. Anyone competing in SCCA autocrosses with their DSP 510 who wants to use flares to take advantage of 7", 8", or 9" wheel widths, must have the flares mounted onto stock fenders. Replacement of the entire fenders with flared fenders is not permitted. Go figure.

Repairing Alloy Wheels:

So you found the perfect wheels for your 510, mounted some very nice low profile tires, and then ... crunch. Hit that pothole and bent your rim. Ouch. Or you want a set of wheels polished or painted or chromed. The good news is that there are MANY places all over the U.S. that can fix your wheels. The bad news is that wheel repairs start at $75, and repaints/polishing start at $50 per wheel. Some shops can also widen your steel or alloy wheels or find a replacement if your wheel is beyond repair. Not all places do the same quality of work. Not all offer the same guarantee, nor the same turnaround time. Ask for customer testimonials or references. I've done a quick web search to compile a list of shops that repair wheels. Many of these places also sell used take-offs, hubcaps, and wheel centercaps too (ask about an extra set of centercaps for your Libres). I have no connection nor experience with any of these companies, so buyer beware.
Attachments
tire_illustration.jpeg
Graphics designed by Mark Sutton, used with permission of Discount Tire Co.
tire_illustration.jpeg (61.67 KiB) Viewed 42635 times
Last edited by okayfine on 05 Apr 2014 10:36, edited 2 times in total.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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okayfine
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Posts: 14133
Joined: 12 Nov 2007 23:02
Location: Newbury Park, CA

1968-1971 Datsun 510

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 12:40

Wheel Size and Type: 13x4
Source/Brand: OEM
Offset / Backspacing: BS=3-15/16
Weight: Unknown
Tire Size: 175/70-13

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: Stock Fitment, Steel
Last edited by okayfine on 31 Mar 2014 12:47, edited 2 times in total.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

User avatar
okayfine
Supporter
Posts: 14133
Joined: 12 Nov 2007 23:02
Location: Newbury Park, CA

1972-1973 Datsun 510

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 12:42

Wheel Size and Type: 13x4.5
Source/Brand: OEM
Offset / Backspacing: BS=3-15/16
Weight: Unknown
Tire Size: 175/70-13 185/70-13 185/60-13

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: Stock Fitment, Steel
Last edited by okayfine on 31 Mar 2014 12:47, edited 1 time in total.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

User avatar
okayfine
Supporter
Posts: 14133
Joined: 12 Nov 2007 23:02
Location: Newbury Park, CA

1962-1964 Chevy II/Nova

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 12:44

Wheel Size and Type: 13x5
Source/Brand: OEM
Offset / Backspacing: BS = 3.75"
Weight: Unknown
Tire Size: 175/70-13 185/70-13 185/60-13

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: Also came 4.5" wide, as well as 14" x 5.5"; steel
Last edited by okayfine on 31 Mar 2014 12:48, edited 1 time in total.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

User avatar
okayfine
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Posts: 14133
Joined: 12 Nov 2007 23:02
Location: Newbury Park, CA

1960-1964 Chevy Corvair

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 12:46

Wheel Size and Type: 13x5.5
Source/Brand: OEM
Offset / Backspacing: BS = 3.75"
Weight: Unknown
Tire Size: 175/70-13 185/70-13 185/60-13

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: Getting hard to find; have been reports of wheel failure with '60-61 wheels (these have hubcap retaining nibs on wheel center). Use '62-'64 Wheels! Steel.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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okayfine
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Posts: 14133
Joined: 12 Nov 2007 23:02
Location: Newbury Park, CA

1974-1983 Toyota RWD (various)

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 12:51

Wheel Size and Type: 13x5
Source/Brand: OEM, Toyota #42611-12241, Hollander #69156
Offset / Backspacing: Unknown
Weight: Unknown
Tire Size: 175/70-13 185/70-13 185/60-13 205/60-13

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: Stamped steel wheel with center like a plus sign; steel.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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okayfine
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Posts: 14133
Joined: 12 Nov 2007 23:02
Location: Newbury Park, CA

1970-1978 Datsun 240/260/280

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 12:53

Wheel Size and Type: 14x5.5
Source/Brand: OEM
Offset / Backspacing: BS = 3-5/8"
Weight: Unknown
Tire Size: 185/70-14 185/60-14 195/60-14 205/60-14

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: Plain Jane steel wheel, came in 4.25", 5", & 5.5" widths, so measure it.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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okayfine
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Posts: 14133
Joined: 12 Nov 2007 23:02
Location: Newbury Park, CA

1979-1983 Datsun 280ZX

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 12:55

Wheel Size and Type: 14x5.5
Source/Brand: OEM, Nissan #40300-p6500, Hollander #62170
Offset / Backspacing: Unknown
Weight: Unknown
Tire Size: 185/70-14 185/60-14 195/60-14 205/60-14

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: Plain steel wheel (for the stealth look).
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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okayfine
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Posts: 14133
Joined: 12 Nov 2007 23:02
Location: Newbury Park, CA

1979-1983 Datsun 280ZX (option wheel)

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 12:56

Wheel Size and Type: 14x6
Source/Brand: OEM
Offset / Backspacing: ?
Weight: ?
Tire Size: 185/70-14 185/60-14 195/60-14 205/60-14

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: Stamped steel wheel with hexagonal painted face
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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okayfine
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Posts: 14133
Joined: 12 Nov 2007 23:02
Location: Newbury Park, CA

1981-1987 Toyota RWD (various)

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 12:58

Wheel Size and Type: 14x5.5
Source/Brand: OEM, Toyota #42611-14440-01, Hollander #69141
Offset / Backspacing: ?
Weight: ?
Tire Size: 185/70-14 185/60-14 195/60-14 205/60-14

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: Stamped steel wheel with alternating black and silver starburst pattern

celica2.jpg
celica2.jpg (2.61 KiB) Viewed 42626 times
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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okayfine
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Posts: 14133
Joined: 12 Nov 2007 23:02
Location: Newbury Park, CA

1985-1987 Nissan 200SX

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 13:00

Wheel Size and Type: 15x6
Source/Brand: OEM, Nissan #40300-07F00, Hollander #62165
Offset / Backspacing: ?
Weight: ?
Tire Size: 195/50-15 205/50-15

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: Steel

200sxs.gif
200sxs.gif (9.71 KiB) Viewed 42625 times
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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okayfine
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Posts: 14133
Joined: 12 Nov 2007 23:02
Location: Newbury Park, CA

American Racing Libre

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 13:06

Wheel Size and Type: 13x5.5
Source/Brand: American Racing
Offset / Backspacing: BS = 3-15/16"
Weight: <13lb
Tire Size: 175/70-13 185/70-13 185/60-13 205/60-13

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: The classic 510 wheel. Used on many 510s. Uses square shank lug nuts with washers.

libre.JPG
libre.JPG (5.29 KiB) Viewed 42622 times
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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okayfine
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Posts: 14133
Joined: 12 Nov 2007 23:02
Location: Newbury Park, CA

Shelby "Libre" (copy)

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 13:07

Wheel Size and Type: 13x5.5
Source/Brand: Shelby Racing
Offset / Backspacing: ?
Weight: ?
Tire Size: 175/70-13 185/70-13 185/60-13 205/60-13

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: A copy of the classic 510 wheel; wheel has less clearance for lug nuts
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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okayfine
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Posts: 14133
Joined: 12 Nov 2007 23:02
Location: Newbury Park, CA

American Racing Spectre

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 13:09

Wheel Size and Type: 13x5.5
Source/Brand: American Racing
Offset / Backspacing: ?
Weight: ?
Tire Size: 175/70-13 185/70-13 185/60-13 205/60-13

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: Looks like a plus sign, typically black and silver, One-pc cast wheel.

spectre2.jpg
spectre2.jpg (8.75 KiB) Viewed 42596 times
Last edited by okayfine on 05 Apr 2014 10:37, edited 2 times in total.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson

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okayfine
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Posts: 14133
Joined: 12 Nov 2007 23:02
Location: Newbury Park, CA

Western Mini-lite (copy)

Postby okayfine » 31 Mar 2014 13:10

Wheel Size and Type: 13x5.5
Source/Brand: Western Wheels
Offset / Backspacing: ?
Weight: ?
Tire Size: 175/70-13 185/70-13 185/60-13 205/60-13

Notes or 510 Mods Needed: '70's one-pc cast wheel
Attachments
wmini2.jpg
wmini2.jpg (9.66 KiB) Viewed 42596 times
Last edited by okayfine on 05 Apr 2014 10:38, edited 1 time in total.
Because when you spend a silly amount of money on a silly, trivial thing that will help you not one jot, you are demonstrating that you have a soul and a heart and that you are the sort of person who has no time for Which? magazine. – Jeremy Clarkson


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